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Table 6 Example of treatment 3 & 4

From: What are the factors and needs promoting mobility-as-a-service? Findings from the Swiss Household Energy Demand Survey (SHEDS)

T3 (policy planned) T4 (policy decided)
With the Paris Climate Agreement the international community of states aims to keep global warming below 2 degrees. Following that, the Swiss government has defined a target to reduce national emissions by 50% compared to 1990 levels. Since the transportation sector is responsible for a large share of total CO2 emissions in Switzerland, one central climate policy pillar addresses mobility and transportation.
Across the world one can observe similar efforts. The Chinese Government aims to achieve a quota of at least 8 percent of electric cars by 2019, rising up to 20% in 2025. To fulfil this target, they introduced a fixed sales quota for car suppliers, but also implemented various policies directly addressing consumers, such as the introduction of different number plates (with restricted quantities for non-electric cars). Other countries abolished highway fees for electric cars (Norway) or increased fuel levies (France). Oxford decided to ban all diesel and fuel-powered cars in the city centre from 2020 onwards and similar policies are discussed in several German cities.
Assume now, that the Swiss government has announced, that it wants to achieve a new sales quota of 20% of electric cars by 2023.
The policy to achieve this target has not been defined yet and is matter of discussion in the parliament.
With the Paris Climate Agreement the international community of states aims to keep global warming below 2 degrees. Following that, the Swiss government has defined a target to reduce national emissions by 50% compared to 1990 levels. Since the transportation sector is responsible for a large share of total CO2 emissions in Switzerland, one central climate policy pillar addresses mobility and transportation.
Across the world one can observe similar efforts. The Chinese Government aims to achieve a quota of at least 8 percent of electric cars by 2019, rising up to 20% in 2025. To fulfil this target, they introduced a fixed sales quota for car suppliers, but also implemented various policies directly addressing consumers, such as the introduction of different number plates (with restricted quantities for non-electric cars). Other countries abolished highway fees for electric cars (Norway) or increased fuel levies (France). Oxford decided to ban all diesel and fuel-powered cars in the city centre from 2020 onwards and similar policies are discussed in several German cities.
Assume now, that the Swiss government has announced, that it wants to achieve a new sales quota of 20% of electric cars by 2023.
From 2020 onwards several measures will be implemented step-wise, such as increasing fuel levies, vehicle import restrictions and a ban of non-electric vehicles in the city centre.